Forum comments in chronological order

Disclaimer: I am not responsible for what people (other than myself) write in the forums. Please report any abuse, such as insults, slander, spam and illegal material, and I will take appropriate actions. Don't feed the trolls.

Jag tar inget ansvar för det som skrivs i forumet, förutom mina egna inlägg. Vänligen rapportera alla inlägg som bryter mot reglerna, så ska jag se vad jag kan göra. Som regelbrott räknas till exempel förolämpningar, förtal, spam och olagligt material. Mata inte trålarna.

Jun 2019

The TTY demystified

Anonymous
Wed 5-Jun-2019 08:01
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ to long, jesus christ write up a summery for us lazy people

Haha, this article IS the summary

Dialog

Anonymous
Thu 6-Jun-2019 00:21
I can't seem to build this. backend.c and backend_z.h seem to be missing from the tarball.

The Å-machine

Anonymous
Thu 6-Jun-2019 00:55
Cool stuff!! :)

Dialog

lft
Linus Åkesson
Thu 6-Jun-2019 01:16
I can't seem to build this. backend.c and backend_z.h seem to be missing from the tarball.

Whoops! Should be fixed now in 0g/02, which is otherwise identical.

The TTY demystified

Anonymous
Fri 7-Jun-2019 02:01
How do a program should propperly handle a "/dev/pts"? I mean, I am able to open that device for read and write, the program is effectively writing and reading stuff, but when I want to close the program gracefully and close the file descriptor used to open the device, the program crashes with no clue on what has happened.
Thanks for the excellent work!
Anonymous
Sun 9-Jun-2019 01:57
Having read your wonderful article, am feeling obliged to give my thanks. BIG thanks! :)

GCR decoding on the fly

Anonymous
Mon 10-Jun-2019 01:50
I love it! Some great leaps / lateral thinking. Spectacular code Linus!

The Å-machine

Anonymous
Thu 13-Jun-2019 08:58
What you are doing is simply awesome. Keep on going.
bertjerred
Bert Jerred
Sun 16-Jun-2019 08:45
Fascinating and fun. Thank you for sharing this!

GCR decoding on the fly

Anonymous
Wed 19-Jun-2019 10:45
Great article! I have integrated the code into my disk utility and it allows me to scan the entire disk in 21 seconds using an interleave of 2 sectors!! I only send the first 4B and an error byte from each sector back to the C64, so that's why I can hit interleave of 2. I used the short checksum snipet from Shards of Fancy. I also noticed in Shards of Fancy that you use the "nop" for density 0 and 1 (Tracks 25-35), not just the slowest ones (31-35).

Now for some improvements!!
1) instead of storing $0100,$01FF->$0101, I store $01FF->$0100 so the data does not have a wrap. This is accomplished by starting the stack at $FF instead of $00, and also changing the final few instructions in the zero-page from pha before tsx to tsx before pha. This works because pha does not change the zero flag.
2) if the first byte of data is not $55, I give up after 3 tries and report error 04 for that sector and move on. also, if parity fails, give up after 3 tries and report error 05. This is because my project is a disk utility and not a loader :) I cannot "hang" trying forever.
3) save/restore the last 8B of stack, and SP, just before/after this routine, so I can still jsr/rts everywhere else in the code.
4) save/restore a portion of ZP before/after reading all the sectors I wanted, so I can return to KERNAL when done. Returning to KERNAL is important for my utility project. I am using $86-$E5 for the ZP code and only save/restore $99-$B4 -- the rest is just zero'd out.

Cheers!

VIC Timing Chart

Anonymous
Wed 19-Jun-2019 23:18
this is very helpful indeed. thanks a lot!

fieserwolf

The TTY demystified

Anonymous
Thu 20-Jun-2019 23:03
Amazing stuff! Thank you!

Dialog

Anonymous
Sun 23-Jun-2019 18:52

lft wrote:

I can't seem to build this. backend.c and backend_z.h seem to be missing from the tarball.

Whoops! Should be fixed now in 0g/02, which is otherwise identical.


That got me going, thanks. Have you ever considered putting this in a public repository so that others can contribute, too?


I really like the idea of this system: it's a nice sweet spot between writing and programming.